North Bucks Branch Archive Project

Main Branch site:

Branch site

The Branch web site contains up to date information about ringing in North Bucks. Much of the information formerly in this site can now be found there.


Latest on this site:

News from Bletchley

The Fenny Stratford and Bletchley newspaper from the end of Victoria's reign provides a detailed insight into the formation of the Bletchley band

A new newspaper in the 1930's continues the story.


Welcome to the North Bucks Archives site.

This is a collection of information from various sources that is being copied into a single database.

It is intended as a resource for ringers wanting to research their local bells and ringers and also to be a record of ringing performances in North Bucks.

All the information in the archives has already been published in Annual reports, The Ringing World and other sources. The archives just bring it all together.

The History of ringing in the North Bucks Branch starts many years before the formation of the branch in 1904 and continues up to the present day.

Aims for the project in 2018

As well as the continued addition of "new" information from the local papers etc., the Archivist will be taking on a new role with the leadership of the new Central Council History & Archive Workgroup.

That means a lot of what has been developed on this site is to be expanded into a wider world.

Meanwhile,

everything we do continues to increase the resource. It may be peals and quarters, or work on towers and bells. For example, Olney's sound control roof:

Factoid of the Month

07/09/1905 - Shenley - The local newspaper gives the actual reason for not ringing long touches before meetings. Bill Butler in 100 Years of the Oxford Diocesan Guild assumes that Rev. Robinson's peal before a Guild meeting was the cause. The local newspaper tells us, however, that 98 ringers turned up at the branch meeting at Newton Longville in June and a band rang a 720 of Bob Minor, thus preventing everyone else from getting the grab. Not popular. This goes to show that researching and joining up the various sources can give a better insight into the past.